Speaker Series Sequel - School to Child Welfare/Prison Pipeline
Sep
18
9:00 AM09:00

Speaker Series Sequel - School to Child Welfare/Prison Pipeline

  • Eugene Lang Building, 5th Floor (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The school-to-prison pipeline is the disproportionate tendency of children of color to become incarcerated or placed in foster care because of harsh educational, discipline, and policing policies and practices.

Join us for a discussion on the impacts and uneven application of school disturbance laws, zero tolerance policies, and school reporting of absences (educational neglect). We will also discuss alternatives based in restorative practices that have the potential to deepen children's engagement with their education rather than disrupting it.

Moderator: Caroline Preston, Senior Editor, The Hechinger Report

Panelists: 

  • Pamela Price-Haynes, principal, Don Pedro Albizu Campos School
  • Gloria Alfinez, parent advocate
  • Roy Waterman, Criminal Justice Project Manager, Jewish Council for Public Affairs

Please contact Kamille Vargas (vargasks@newschool.edu should you require reasonable accommodations for the event

This event is made possible by the DeCamp Foundation

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Automating Inequality in Child Welfare using Predictive Analytics
Jul
17
9:00 AM09:00

Automating Inequality in Child Welfare using Predictive Analytics

  • New School - Theresa Lang Student Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Moderator: Martha Raimon, Senior Associate, Center for the Study of Social Change

Panelists:

  • Andrew White, Deputy Commissioner, ACS

  • Luke Gerber, Action Research Partners

  • Richard Wexler, Executive Director - National Coalition for Child Protection Reform (NCCPR)

  • Virginia Eubanks, Author, Automating Inequality and Professor at University of Albany

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The Right to Counsel in New York City
Jun
20
9:30 AM09:30

The Right to Counsel in New York City

The Right to Counsel in New York City: A Panel Discussion about Victory, Opportunities and Challenges for Tenant Organizing in NYC and Beyond

In a single year, landlords try to evict close to a million people in New York City through the housing court system. Historically, the vast majority of tenants did not have legal representation in housing court. The opposite has been true for landlords who are almost always represented by an attorney. Data shows that at least half of the tenants who are evicted each year could remain in their homes if they had legal representation.

The Right to Counsel NYC Coalition formed to change this power dynamic, which leads not only to evictions, but also to displacement, gentrification and the loss of affordable housing. In 2014, the Right to Counsel Bill (Intro 214) was introduced in New York City Council in order to establish a city-funded right to counsel for low-income tenants facing eviction proceedings. Three years later, the RTCNYC Coalition won an amazing victory making NYC the first City in the nation to establish a right to counsel for tenants facing eviction. Over the next 5 years, this new right will be phased in and many questions remain about how the new right will be implemented.

This panel will focus on the community and tenant driven organizing campaign to win the Right to Counsel in New York City and also examine how this model is scalable to other cities across the country. This panel will explore impacts of policy change that is rooted in community organizing and also look at how those that are affected by the policy can help shape the implementation. The panel will also explore how NYC can be a national model for other cities.

Panelists Include:

  • Susanna Blankley, Right to Counsel Coalition Coordinator (Moderator)

  • Lorena Lopez, Tenant Organizer at Catholic Migration Services

  • Randy Dillard, NYC Tenant, Member of Community Action for Safe Apartments (CASA)

  • Marika Dias, Housing Attorney, Director of Tenant Rights Coalition, Legal Services NYC

  • Maria Lopez-Nunez, Community Organizer, Ironbound Community Corporation, Newark, NJ

Co-sponsored by the Center for New York City Affairs at the New School, The Right to Counsel Coalition and the Community Development Project at the Urban Justice Center

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Lack of Services for Families with Disabilities
Jun
12
9:00 AM09:00

Lack of Services for Families with Disabilities

  • New School - Theresa Lang Student Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

New York City’s Administration for Children’s Services (ACS) is currently being sued in federal court for failing to provide adequate services to parents with intellectual disabilities. Nationwide, parents with disabilities are more likely to have their children removed by child welfare agencies than parents without disabilities. Rather than being referred to resources that could support them in their parenting, parents with disabilities are too often separated from their children based on assumptions about what they can and cannot do. This panel will discuss these trends and the kinds of supports and services ACS could provide to strengthen families and keep them together.

Moderator: Emma Baber-Kessler, LCSW, Sinergia

Panelists:

  • Donald Lash, Executive Director Sinergia, Author "When the Welfare People Come"

  • Lauren Shapiro, Director of Brooklyn Defender Services, Family Defense Practice

  • Thalia Julme, Staff Attorney at New York Legal Assistance Group

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Dare to Reimagine Integration for New York City’s Public Schools
Jun
5
5:00 PM17:00

Dare to Reimagine Integration for New York City’s Public Schools

The Center for New York City Affairs and the NYC Alliance for School Integration and Desegregation (ASID) invites you to Dare to Reimagine Integration for New York City’s Public Schools. After one year of research and extensive collaboration, ASID is excited to share its policy agenda with parents, students, educators, advocates, and allies who demand a more equitable school system for all of our children.

Join ASID for an opportunity to learn more about ASID’s vision and how you can play a pivotal role in tackling the entrenched divide that has separated New York City’s children for too long. #StillNotEqual

Reception to follow immediately afterward.

Want to get started supporting real school integration in NYC right away? Sign our petition demanding the NYC Department of Education to create an Office of School Integration and Equity.

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Parallels between Mass Incarceration and Foster Care
May
15
9:00 AM09:00

Parallels between Mass Incarceration and Foster Care

  • The New School - Theresa Lang Student Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This panel will examine the resemblance between the mass incarceration system and the child welfare system. Both systems tout a protective function but end up tearing families and communities apart. The panelists will examine the meaning of truly protecting children, questioning not only the similarities between the two systems but the disproportionate number of children of color who are separated from their families, communities and all they are familiar with. For years we have been speaking about “the new Jim Crow”; some are now referring to the foster care system as Jim’s twin sibling, “the new Jane Crow.”

Panelists

  • Tasheva Gadson, former foster child

  • Gerald Campbell, former foster child, scholar of the Institute for Transformative Mentoring

  • Andrea Morrell professor, Guttman College

Moderator

  • Shanelle Matthews, activist-in-residence, The New School, former communications director, Black Lives Matter
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Book Launch: Neighborhood Success Stories by Carol Lamberg
May
7
6:00 PM18:00

Book Launch: Neighborhood Success Stories by Carol Lamberg

Join Milano as Carol Lamberg launches her new book, Neighborhood Success Stories: Creating and Sustaining Affordable Housing in New York. A long-time leader of New York City’s affordable housing movement, Carol was Executive Director from 1983 until 2014 of the Settlement Housing Fund, one of the city’s largest and most innovative sponsors of affordable housing. Part memoir, part policy analysis, Neighborhood Success Stories distills key lessons for building and managing affordable housing. Carol reflects on the social purpose, vision, and practical challenges of the projects she’s been involved in, while vividly capturing the life and times of those who engaged in the creation and maintenance of housing and those who have benefited from it.

“Carol Lamberg knows her stuff, and she shares it all in this book. It’s a testament to her decades-long struggle to create affordable housing in New York City by any means necessary—one that has great relevance today, even as federal support for housing programs has dwindled to a trickle.”
Gale A. Brewer, Manhattan Borough President

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Tough Calculations: What is a College Worth?
May
3
9:00 AM09:00

Tough Calculations: What is a College Worth?

  • The New School - Theresa Lang Student Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Choosing the right college has never been easy. But today the stakes feel higher than ever. College cost and debt is rising. Many schools have poor graduation rates or do little to help students find jobs. And the economy is changing at a breakneck pace. How can students and families decide which institution will offer the greatest return for their hard-earned tuition dollars?

Join the Center for New York City Affairs for a discussion on the latest tools for calculating the true value of a school. What factors should students consider in developing a college list? Are on-line sites and rankings helpful? And how can all of this information be used to make our higher education system more responsive to the needs of students?

Keynote Presentation by Kaitlin Mulhere, special projects and college rankings editor, Money Magazine

Kaitlin Mulhere will then join in a discussion with:

  • David Helene, co-founder of Edquity, an on-line college financial
    planning tool

  • Khushboo Jamal, Brooklyn College graduate & CUNY Tech Fellow

  • Angie Kamath, university dean for continuing education and workforce development, CUNY

  • Sonia Szymanski, co-director of college inquiry, College Access: Research and Action (CARA)

Moderated by Kim Nauer, education research director, Center for New York City Affairs, The New School

Event is free to attend but registration is required.

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School Choice and Integration in NYC
May
2
9:00 AM09:00

School Choice and Integration in NYC

Forty percent of New York City kindergartners take advantage of school choice to enroll in schools other than their zoned neighborhood school. What does this mean for the children who choose, and what does it mean for the schools they leave behind?

Senior research fellow Nicole Mader of the New School's Center for New York City Affairs will present her research findings, based on student-level zone assignment data for 700,000 pupils over 10 years.

School choice has allowed thousands of children to leave low-performing schools for higher performing schools, often outside their neighborhoods. But it has also resulted in higher concentrations of poverty and shrinking enrollments and budgets in the schools they leave behind, making it ever hard for those schools to serve their neighborhoods well.

The presentation will be followed by a panel discussion including:

  • NYS Board of Regents Chancellor Betty Rosa
  • New School Professor Maya Wiley, co-chair of the city's school diversity working group
  • Dennis Morgan, PTA president of PS 180 in Harlem and a member of the Community Education Council for District 3.
  • Allison Roda, author of Inequity in Gifted and Talented Programs: Parental Choices about Status, School Opportunity, and Second-Generation Segregation.
  • Ujju Aggarwal, New School professor and author of the forthcoming book The Color of Choice: Raced Rights and the Structure of Citizenship

Clara Hemphill, director of education policy and editor of InsideSchools, will moderate.

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 A Symposium on Socially-Engaged Learning and Public Scholarship
Apr
27
10:00 AM10:00

A Symposium on Socially-Engaged Learning and Public Scholarship

  • Theresa Lang Community and Student Center, The New School (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

How might we advance The New School's legacy of challenging the status quo through socially engaged learning and scholarship?

Join us for a day of thoughtful conversations, peer exchanges and reflections at the Collaboratory Symposium 2018. Be a part of a university-wide network and engage with faculty, students and community partners at the forefront of innovative approaches and practices to creating a more just, resilient and equitable society.

10:00 am - 10:30 am - Tea/ Coffee & Entrance activities
10:30 am - 11:00 am - Welcoming remarks / Keynote
11:00 am - 12:30 pm - Panel Discussion and Q & A
12: 30 pm - 1 pm -  Lunch Served
1:10 pm -  2:40 pm - Roundtable Discussions Round 1 & Reportback
2:45 pm - 4:15 pm - Roundtable Discussions Round 2 & Reportback
4:15 pm- 5:00 pm - Closing Reception

Panelists :

Maya Wiley, Joseph Heathcott, Jess Irish, Ben Wilson, Cynthia Lawson, Rob Robinson, Masoom Moitra

Panelists will deep-dive into questions around socially engaged learning, practice and scholarship at The New School: How do socially-engaged projects and pedagogy consider and incorporate social justice issues and methods? How can students be better prepared for engaged learning with external partners and communities? What institutional processes, structures and resources would better support strong community partnerships and enhance the social justice outcomes of engaged learning activities?  


Roundtable Themes and Facilitators :

  • Activism through Arts and Culture: Cecilia Rubino, Manon Slome
  • Creating Transformation through Public Dialogue: Gabrielle Bendiner-Viani, Lydia Matthews
  • Community-engaged Social Ventures: Dennis Derryck, Mehdi Salehi, Michele Kahane, Maru Bautista
  • Co-producing Knowledge through Public Scholarship: Joseph Heathcott, Jeffrey Goldfarb, Mary Watson
  • Deconstructing Race and Power: Sujatha Jesudason, Judy Pryor-Ramirez, Ujju Aggarwal, Nadia Williams
  • Imagining Change with Youth Partners: Austen Osworth, Bernadette Ludwig, Jessica Walker
  • Media and Technology for Public Engagement: Anezka Sebek, Colleen Macklin, Sarah Montague
  • Mobilizing for Environmental Justice: Ana Baptista, John Clinton, Jess Irish, Stephen Metts
  • New Spaces for Civic Action: Braden Crooks, Nelesi Rodriguez, Trebor Scholz
  • Participatory Design with Communities: Andrew Shea, John Roach, Lara Penin, Miguel Robles Duran
  • Partnering for Economic Justice: Gabriela Rendon, Kevin McQueen, Lesley Painter-Farrell
  • Preparing for Community Engagement: Cynthia Lawson, Chris London
  • Visualizing Data and Reality for Social Action: Aron Hill, Maya Georgieva
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Conference on Cities, Climate and Migration
Apr
27
9:00 AM09:00

Conference on Cities, Climate and Migration

Climate change and natural disasters are fundamental drivers of migration and will grow in importance in the future. Through interdisciplinary panels and breakout sessions, the Conference on Cities, Climate and Migration, hosted by the Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility in collaboration with other departments at The New School, will address the challenges facing cities in the U.S., examine issues of social justice in planning responses, and explore the role of cities as actors on the national and global level.

Breakout Session 2:30 - 3:30pm: Feet in 2 Worlds, A project of the Center for New York City Affairs at The New School: The session will feature data visualization on the aftermath of Hurricane Maria.

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The Corner of Intimate Partner Violence and Child Welfare
Apr
17
9:00 AM09:00

The Corner of Intimate Partner Violence and Child Welfare

The panel is made up of survivors of domestic/intimate partner violence and child witnesses who will provide their perspective on being a survivor and the response by the Administration of Children's Services (ACS) to their domestic violence experience. Panelists will give recommendations on how child welfare officials can better respond to and assist survivors and their children. 

Panelists include:

  • Katherine M. Gerald, Child Welfare Campaign Chair, Voices of Women
  • Johnnie Lee Fielder, Child Witness to Intimate Partner Violence

  • Dana Hanuszczak, EMT, CASAC-P, Community-Organizer for Membership/Meetings, Voices of Women

  • Hope Lyzette Newton, Steering Committee Chair, Voices of Women

  • Nedene Simon, Board Member, Voices of Women

  • Sabra Simon, Child Witness to Intimate Partner Violence

Moderator: Tracey D. Little, LCSW, CASAC, Board Chair, Voices of Women

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Working with Families of the Poor: Taking Forward the Legacy of Salvador Minuchin
Apr
12
5:00 PM17:00

Working with Families of the Poor: Taking Forward the Legacy of Salvador Minuchin

SpeakersEma Genijovich, Lic. (Psychologist), International Consultant and Trainer in Systems and Family Therapy ⦁ Carol Shapiro, Founder of Family Justice and La Bodega de la Familia ⦁ Veronica Barenstein, Director, Family and Couples Therapy Program, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA ⦁ Rita Abadi, LMHC, Mount Sinai Sexual Assault and Violence Intervention (SAVI) Program ⦁ Mindy Fullilove, Professor of Urban Policy and Health, The New School ⦁ Alberto Minujin, Executive Director, Equity for Children

Salvador Minuchin's work bridges the complexity of individual and family needs in helping to overcome trauma. Child advocates and family therapists across the profession can do so much more to support children and their families in this area. 

Activists, educators, and students -- Join us for a discussion that will help you in your work!

For more information, please call Beatrice Mauger at (212) 229-5400 ext. 2455

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What's Next for Children's Behavioral Health Care?
Apr
11
9:00 AM09:00

What's Next for Children's Behavioral Health Care?

  • The New School Theresa Lang Student Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

One in ten children in New York State has a serious emotional disturbance. But the system designed to serve them is chronically overwhelmed. Sick kids sit on waitlists. Mental health and substance abuse clinics struggle to hire pediatric specialists. And providers lose money on Medicaid-funded programs.

When the State launched its massive project to redesign Medicaid, it committed to expanding children’s behavioral health services. The goals: catch problems early, keep kids out of institutions, and allow providers to build urgently needed capacity.

But children’s reform has repeatedly been put on hold, and its future is uncertain.

Join the Center for New York City Affairs for a discussion of what’s next for children’s behavioral health care: What do vulnerable kids and adolescents need? What are the barriers to accessing care? What steps should the City and State take to improve the system? What’s next for kids in the State’s Medicaid redesign?

Panelists include:

  • Donna Bradbury, Associate Commissioner, Division of Integrated Community Services for Children and Families, NYS Office of Mental Health

  • Gail Nayowith, Principal of 1digit LLC and Chair, NYCDOHMH Community Services Board

  • Jennifer Havens, MD, Director and Chief of Service, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Bellevue Hospital Center

  • Kenton Kirby, Director, Make it Happen and Director, Clinical and Trauma Support Services, Crown Heights Community Mediation Center

  • Tonia Spence, Senior Director, Early Childhood Services, The Jewish Board

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Film Screening - Beyond Conviction
Apr
10
6:00 PM18:00

Film Screening - Beyond Conviction

Please join the Institute for Transformative Mentoring at their monthly Social Justice Movie Night. The featured film is BEYOND CONVICTION.

BEYOND CONVICTION offers an eye-opening look into a process that could have far-reaching repercussions for the ways we approach crime, criminal justice and conflict resolution. 

In 1998, the state of Pennsylvania launched a pioneering mediation program in which victims of violent crimes or their family members could meet face-to-face with the perpetrators of their crimes. The program provides an opportunity for survivors to express long-brewing emotions and get answers to questions that have haunted them. It also allows perpetrators to express remorse and attempt to make amends after years of reflection. BEYOND CONVICTION follows three pairs of survivors and perpetrators as they go through this emotionally intense program. This powerful documentary provides a rare glimpse into the lingering pain, questions and regrets for both sides and reveals the bold and difficult path to redemption and reconciliation.

*Refreshments and a moderated discussion will follow the screening. 

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NYC School Admissions: Public & Private
Apr
5
6:30 PM18:30

NYC School Admissions: Public & Private

Applying to pre-kindergarten or kindergarten in NYC? Considering both public and private schools? Join the experts who have visited hundreds of schools at this free event to demystify the application process. Gina Malin, executive director of the Parents League of New York, will talk about private schools. Clara Hemphill, InsideSchools founder, will talk about public schools.

The event is free. A $25 ticket includes a copy of Hemphill's book, New York City's Best Public Pre-K and Elementary Schools.

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Michelle Jones Lecture "The Big Set Back: Consequences of Criminal Convictions"
Mar
30
10:00 AM10:00

Michelle Jones Lecture "The Big Set Back: Consequences of Criminal Convictions"

  • New School - Theresa Lang Student Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

 Michelle Jones is a first-year doctoral student in the American Studies program at New York University, and a Research Fellow at the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History at Harvard University. While incarcerated, Jones published and presented her research findings to dispel notions of the reach and intellectual capacity of justice-involved women. Also while incarcerated, Jones presented legislative testimony on a reentry alterative she created for long-term incarcerated people that was approved by the Indiana State Interim Committee on the Criminal Code. She is currently on the board of Constructing Our Future, a reentry alterative for women created by incarcerated women in Indiana, which provides women leaving prison with access to rehabilitative programming, carpentry job skills and the means to earn their own home and serves as Entrepreneurship Development Director for The Ladies of Hope Ministries as well as a 2017 Beyond the Bars fellow.

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PUP Speaker Series: An Evening with NYS Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli
Mar
26
6:00 PM18:00

PUP Speaker Series: An Evening with NYS Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli

  • The New School - Theresa Lang Student Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join us for a discussion with Thomas P. DiNapoli, New York State Comptroller since 2007, and graduate of Milano School for International Affairs, Management and Public and Urban Policy (’88) on his efforts as trustee of America’s third largest state pension fund to shape corporate policies and practices on environmental, social and governance issues and achieve strong returns for the Fund. In his tenure as State Comptroller, the New York State Pension Fund has been one of the most active in the U.S. in promoting sustainable business practices among its portfolio companies on a wide range of issues, including climate change, board diversity, LGBT rights and political spending.

Moderated by Charles H. Allison Jr., Associate Professor of Professional Practice, The New School.

For more information, please contact milanocommunications@newschool.edu

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Child Welfare: The Unintended Consequence of the War on Drugs
Mar
13
9:00 AM09:00

Child Welfare: The Unintended Consequence of the War on Drugs

  • The New School - Theresa Lang Student Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Moderated by Aarin Michelle Williams, Senior Staff Attorney at National Advocates for Pregnant Women (NAPW)

Panelists include:

  -Dinah Ortiz, Parent Advocate Supervisor at The Bronx Defender Services

  -Kassandra Frederique, New York State Director at the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA)

  -Emma Ketteringham, Managing Attorney of the Family Defense Practice at The Bronx Defender Services

The Speaker Series is designed to bring community, families, parents, and professionals together to address timely and pertinent areas of concern related to child welfare.

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Getting Proactive in the Preserving & Strengthening of Human Services in NY
Mar
9
9:00 AM09:00

Getting Proactive in the Preserving & Strengthening of Human Services in NY

Join us for a conversation with policymakers, economists, and human services experts focused on the economic and social impact of human services CBOs, and the need to preserve and strengthen their critical role in building foundational supports that contribute to the health and well-being of individuals, families, and communities. The event is being organized in partnership with the Human Services Council of NY and will offer an overview of a new report by Oliver Wyman and SeaChange Capital Partners and commissioned by Alliance for Strong Families and Communities and American Public Human Services Association, A National Imperative: Joining Forces to Strengthen Human Services in America, and focus on what New York can do to address the underlying causes of financial vulnerability in this sector and actions to ensure its sustainability.

Moderator: Christina Greer, Associate Professor of Political Science, Fordham University

Panelists:
-Fran Barrett, New York State Interagency Coordinator for Nonprofit Organizations - ‎New York State Governor's Office
-Dr. Herminia Palacio, Deputy Mayor of Health and Human Services, Office of the Mayor
-Dylan Roberts, Partner, Oliver Wyman
-Emary Aronson, Chief Program Officer, Robin Hood Foundation

Doors open at 8:30 am and an opportunity for networking will take place after the event.

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Film Screening - Life and Debt
Mar
6
6:00 PM18:00

Film Screening - Life and Debt

  • The New School - Theresa Lang Student Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join ITM for their monthly Social Justice Film Screening. 

Life and Debt takes as its subject Jamaica's economic decline in the 20th century. The story has reverberations in the plight of other third-world nations blindsided by globalization, like Ghana and Haiti. After England granted Jamaica independence in 1962, the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF) stepped in with a series of loans. These loans came with strings attached--the kind that would eventually plunge the country $7 billion into debt, stranded without the resources to dig themselves out.

Refreshments and a moderated discussion will follow the screening.

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Monitoring the Minimum Wage
Feb
14
9:00 AM09:00

Monitoring the Minimum Wage

The minimum wage in New York City has been increasing, incrementally, from $8 per hour in 2014 to $15 per hour by December 31, 2018. Each increase presents opportunities and challenges for local businesses and for workers and jobseekers earning at or near the minimum wage. Join members of the local business community in a discussion about how they are adapting to the minimum wage increase, how those adaptations are impacting employees earning the minimum wage or just above, and what workforce development stakeholders can do to be responsive and proactive to these changes

Presenter: James Parrott - Director of Economic and Fiscal Policy, Center for NYC Affairs

Moderator: Andrew Rasiej - Founder and CEO, Civic Hall

Panelists:

  • Adria Powell - President, Cooperative Home Care Associates

  • Elvira Ryder - HR Consultant, Food & Beverage Industry

  • Katy Gaul-Stigge - President & CEO, Goodwill Industries of NYNJ

  • Ulanda Garrett - Recruiter, AlliedBarton Security Services

In collaboration with the Workforce Field Building Hub

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Poverty, Race & Child Welfare
Feb
13
9:00 AM09:00

Poverty, Race & Child Welfare

Please join us for a discussion on child welfare, race, and poverty. In collaboration with the Child Welfare Organizing Project, this panel focuses on how and why poverty is often framed as neglect in the child welfare system. This discussion puts the experience, needs, ideas, and aspirations of parents at the center of the conversation.

Panelists:
-Erin Cloud from Bronx Defenders
-David Lansner from Lanser and Kubitschek
-Michelle Burrell from Neighborhood Defenders Services Harlem
-Phalizyah White from Parent Representative
-Anequa Campbell from Brooklyn Defender Services

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