Youth Justice, Police and NYC’s Neighborhoods

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM THERESA LANG COMMUNITY AND STUDENT CENTER, ARNHOLD HALL 55 WEST 13TH STREET, 2ND FLOOR [Photo by Andrew Hinderaker]Center for New York City Affairs at The New School presentsa Child Welfare Watch forum Co-sponsored by the New York Juvenile Justice Initiative

There’s been a sea change in New York City juvenile justice policy and police practices over the last two years: Courts now place most teen delinquents in city programs close to home, rather than upstate; and police have sharply reduced the use of stop and frisk, a tactic that overwhelmingly targeted young men of color. Policymakers in the new administration of Mayor Bill de Blasio seek to drive change even further, to improve police-community relations and strengthen juvenile justice programs while also securing public safety. How does the administration intend to pursue its objectives? What do community leaders and others believe needs to change? Will young people and community residents gain a meaningful voice in both policy and practice? And can better data collection and data sharing help shape new solutions, both inside and outside the walls of government?

A conversation with:

  • Gladys Carrion, commissioner, NYC Administration for Children's Services
  • Joanne Jaffe, bureau chief, New York Police Department
  • Chino Hardin, field trainer/organizer, Center for NuLeadership on Urban Solutions
  • Gabrielle Prisco, director, Juvenile Justice Project, Correctional Association of New York
  • Chris Watler, project director, Harlem Community Justice Center at Center for Court Innovation

Moderated by:

  • Andrew White, director, Center for New York City Affairs, The New School

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=THUUJEtPcQQ&feature=youtu.be

 

This forum is made possible thanks to the generous support of The Prospect Hill Foundation and the Sirus Fund.  Additional funding for the Child Welfare Watch project is provided by the Child Welfare Fund, the Ira W. DeCamp Foundation and the Booth Ferris Foundation.

Child Welfare Watch News Digest - November 21, 2013

Here’s a roundup of this week’s news on low-income children, youth and their families:

Today, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) released it’s annual assessment of homelessness in the U.S. The report found that since 2010 homelessness among individuals declined nearly 4.9 percent, homelessness among family households declined by 8.2 percent, and Veteran homelessness declined by 24.2 percent. Despite the overall decrease, New York City experienced one of the largest one-year increases in homelessness between 2012 and 2013. Read the full report, including state-specific information, here.

This week, The American Prospect highlighted an innovative program in New York that is helping low-income families put money aside to pay down debts and cover unexpected expenses.

Calendar

  • November 21 - Education Funders Research Initiative will release its third white paper “Building Blocks for Better Schools: How the next mayor can prepare New York’s students for college and careers.” Watch the live stream discussion of priorities for the next mayor and chancellor.
  • November 25 - The New York City Council will hold an oversight hearing on Hunger in NYC. The Hearing is a joint effort of the Committee on General Welfare, the Committee on Women’s Issues and the Committee on Health.
  • December 4 - Choosing Leaders for a New Era. Join the Center for New York City Affairs for a post-election roundtable discussion including behind-the-scenes stories direct from the campaign teams and analysts. This forum will examine the mayoral, comptroller and public advocate races. RSVP here.

 

Watch Interviews from our Recent Event "Baby Steps: Poverty, Chronic Stress, and New York's Youngest Children"

On October 4th, Child Welfare Watch hosted a forum on New York City's youngest children. Our panel of experts discussed what babies and very small children need in order to grow healthy and strong--and the potentially devastating impacts of poverty and chronic stress on early childhood development. Dr. Jack Shonkoff, M.D., is the FAMRI Professor of Child Health and Development at the Harvard School of Public Health and the Harvard Graduate School of Education; professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital; and director of the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University.

Shonkoff talks about how babies' brains develop:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONexJuwRPAk&feature=share&list=PL_1Vy3snT0I4aNTsQV7stS1bxebU4px6u

Shonkoff on the role of communities in building parents' capacity to support child development:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2TxncdlPJ2Y&feature=share&list=PL_1Vy3snT0I4aNTsQV7stS1bxebU4px6u

Piazadora Footman is a parent; an editorial assistant at Rise, a magazine written by and for parents in the child welfare system; and a former participant in the Chances for Children dyadic therapy program for parents and very young children.

Here, she talks about the difference between hands-on, parent-child therapy and traditional, classroom-based parenting classes:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5G6p4VZGOf4&feature=share&list=PL_1Vy3snT0I4aNTsQV7stS1bxebU4px6u

You can also watch a full video of the forum here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqXp-YANVEA&feature=share&list=PL_1Vy3snT0I4aNTsQV7stS1bxebU4px6u

Upcoming Event: Poverty, Chronic Stress, and New York's Youngest Children

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Center for New York City Affairs at The New School presents

a Child Welfare Watch forum:

Baby Steps: Poverty, Chronic Stress, and New York's Youngest Children

 Friday, October 4, 8:30-10:30am

 Tishman Auditorium

Alvin Johnson/J.M. Kaplan Hall, 66 West 12th Street, Ground Floor

Chronic stress and early trauma shape the brain development of very young children. Increasingly, research shows that innovative, early-life work with infants, toddlers and their parents can help prevent the need for much more costly interventions later on. Can we reduce the likelihood of abuse, neglect and mental illness in stressed-out, low-income families? What kinds of targeted interventions are working? And how should government and nonprofits respond? A conversation with experts in the field, and the release of the latest edition of Child Welfare Watch.

 Keynote remarks by

Jack P. Shonkoff, M.D., the Julius B. Richmond FAMRI Professor of Child Health and Development at the Harvard School of Public Health and the Harvard Graduate School of Education; Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital; and Director of the university-wide Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University.

 Followed by a conversation with

Linda Lausell Bryant, executive director, Inwood House

Susan Chinitz, professor of clinical pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Piazadora Footman, parent; editorial assistant at Rise, a magazine written by and for parents in the child welfare system; and Chances for Children participant

Benita Miller, deputy commissioner of family permanency services, NYC Administration for Children's Services

 Moderated by

Andrew White, director, Center for New York City Affairs at The New School

 Admission is free, but you must RSVP.

The Child Welfare Watch project is made possible thanks to the generous support of the the Ira W. DeCamp Foundation, the Child Welfare Fund, the Viola W. Bernard Foundation, the Sirus Fund, the Pinkerton Foundation, the Prospect Hill Foundation and the Milano Foundation.

Combating Youth Violence: Concrete Solutions for New York City

Youth violence has declined sharply over two decades--more than 70 percent in New York State, according to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. Yet in some neighborhoods there are now increasing reports of gang activity and violence. Tensions and distrust remain high between law enforcement officials and community members - especially young people. Leaders in other cities have shown that youth, communities, and law enforcement can work together for successful solutions. Can we follow that path in New York? What strategies are already working, and how can we make them stronger? http://youtu.be/kjM3WaXyopE

Remarks from:

Followed by a conversation with:

  • Reean Charles, Youth Organizing to Save Our Streets (Y.O.S.O.S.)
  • Melissa Mark-Viverito, Council Member, District 8, New York City Council
  • Iesha Sekou, Executive Director, Street Corner Resources

Moderated by:

 

This event and the Center's research about youth and families is made possible by the generous support of the Sirus Fund, the Milano Foundation, the Pinkerton Foundation, the Child Welfare Fund, the Viola W. Bernard Foundation and the Ira W. DeCamp Foundation.

Ties That Bind: Reimagining juvenile justice and child welfare for teens, families and communities

Check out the video from our most recent Child Welfare Watch Community Forum, featuring ACS Commissioner Ronald Richter. The Bloomberg administration is seeking major changes in how the city works with teens in juvenile justice, child protection and foster care. The city would create a complete juvenile justice system in the five boroughs, no longer sending teens to state-run correctional facilities. At the same time, nonprofits would create more intensive, family-centered and community-rooted services for teens in child welfare. Can the city steer more young people away from both foster care and juvenile justice--and work with more parents and teens to help them stay together?

Plus: a discussion of the latest edition of Child Welfare Watch, "One Step Back: The delayed dream of community partnerships," which looks at the partnerships' strengths and limitations, and the challenges of realizing the vision of a system more accountable to communities.

http://youtu.be/TExp8qZ91lo

(For Commissioner Richter's description of the city's new plan for juvenile justice, go to 14:36.)

With:

  • Ron Richter, Commissioner, New York City Administration for Children's Services
  • Gabrielle Prisco, Director of the Juvenile Justice Project, the Correctional Association of New York
  • Mike Arsham, Executive Director, Child Welfare Organizing Project
  • Andrew White, Director, Center for New York City Affairs
  • and others

 

The Child Welfare Watch project and this event are made possible thanks to the generous support of the Child Welfare Fund, the Ira W. DeCamp Foundation, the Viola W. Bernard Foundation, the Sirus Fund and the Milano Foundation.

Youth in Harm's Way: Marijuana, Law Enforcement and Young New Yorkers

According to the New York Division of Criminal Justice Services, 70 percent of the 50,383 arrests for possession of marijuana in New York City in 2010 were of young people under 30, and 86 percent of those arrested were black and Latino. The debate on the classification of marijuana possession as a crime is heating up nationwide even as the number of arrests in New York has risen. Many substance abuse professionals, public officials and community anti-crime activists support a drug enforcement strategy that includes "broken windows" policing and drug treatment. Others question whether this is worth the cost, including the criminal convictions that can damage young people's prospects for education and jobs. Is it time for change, or not? http://youtu.be/hy2peSGIGSk

A conversation with:

Moderated by: Cindy Rodriguez, WNYC

Supported by the Sirus Fund and the Milano Foundation.

Parent Advocates in the Child Welfare System

Parent advocates are trained to support birth parents as they navigate the city's complicated child welfare system. Research suggests they can help parents successfully move their child welfare cases forward. In June, 2009, the Parent Advocate Initiative (PAI) was created to promote the employment and support of Parent Advocates in foster care agencies. What lessons can be garnered from the experiences of child welfare agencies and parent advocates in the PAI program? What challenges do parent advocates face within New York City's child welfare system? How much value do parent advocates add to child welfare practice? http://youtu.be/R_mdtGrpWxY

Rise Magazine article about the event: Strong Advocates, Strong Families WITH: Commissioner John Mattingly, New York City Administration for Children's Service Commissioner Gladys Carrión, New York State Office of Children and Family Services Jim Purcell, Executive Director, Council of Family and Child Caring Agencies and parents, practitioners, agency directors and others

 

Supported by the Parent Advocate Initiative, the Fund for Social Change,the Child Welfare Fund, Warner Fund, New Yorkers for Children, Annie E. Casey Foundation, Marguerite Casey Foundation,the Ira DeCamp Foundation, the Sirus Fund and the Milano Foundation

Foster Teens in Transition: Are they better off today?

For years, rates of homelessness among the city's former foster youth have remained stubbornly high. The city is connecting more teens to families, keeping more of them out of foster care in the first place, and developing new programs for pregnant and parenting foster teens. But for those remaining in foster and group homes, resources are being cut. Can NYC meet the needs of teens still in care, and those who have recently left? Are young people leaving foster care better prepared for adulthood today than they were a decade ago? http://youtu.be/2WQWKvRyCXk

A conversation with: Linda Lausell Bryant, Executive Director, Inwood House Priti Kataria, ACT (Adolescents Confronting Transition) Director, Lawyers for Children Theresa Nolan, Division Director NYC Programs, Green Chimneys Tyeisha Ayers, Foster youth and participant, Nurse-Family Partnership Maryanne Schretzman, Family Services Coordinator, Office of Deputy Mayor Linda Gibbs Lorraine Stephens, Deputy Commissioner for Family Permanency Services, NYC Administration for Children's Services

Moderated by: Andrew White, Director, Center for New York City Affairs

Click here to read the new Child Welfare Watch report on young adults aging out of the city's foster care system: "In Transition: A better future for youth leaving foster care."

Child Welfare Watch and this event are made possible thanks to the generous support of the Sirus Fund, the Ira W. DeCamp Foundation, the Child Welfare Fund, the Viola W. Bernard Foundation and the Milano Foundation.

The Just City: Equality, Social Justice and the Growing City

Mayors and city governments want to promote economic growth to fill the coffers, pay for services and raise incomes. But what about the injustices of persistent inequality, racial and ethnic segregation and beyond? Can growth instead be harnessed to support equality, diversity and a higher quality of life for everyone? Harvard Professor Susan Fainstein speaks about her new book, The Just City, bridging progressive ideas of justice with the practical work of planners and urban policymakers. Her talk will be followed by a discussion about fairness and justice in New York social policy and planning. http://youtu.be/5LhpyRhHaD0

Remarks by: Susan Fainstein, author, The Just City

Followed by a conversation with: Chung-Wha Hong, Executive Director, New York Immigration Coalition Kenneth Knuckles, Vice Chair, New York City Planning Commission; President & CEO, Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone Brad Lander, Member, New York City Council, District 39

Moderated by: Andrew White, Director, Center for New York City Affairs

 

Supported by the Sirus Fund and the Milano Foundation.