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URBAN MATTERS

Diversity in New York’s Specialized Schools:
A Deeper Data Dive

The most recent Urban Matters reported on patterns of racial and ethnic admission to some of the city’s most prestigious secondary schools and how admissions might more closely mirror the overall composition of the city’s public schools. 

This week we’re following up on comments and questions we received from you.

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Tough Test Ahead: Bringing Racial Diversity To New York’s Specialized High Schools

By Bruce Cory and Nicole Mader

There’s a longstanding debate about why so few Black and Hispanic students are admitted to New York City’s specialized high schools, including Stuyvesant, Bronx Science, and Brooklyn Tech.  

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NEW REPORT

Report | Child Welfare

Executive Summary
Bringing It All Home: Problems and Possibilities Facing NYC's Family Child Care

By Kendra Hurley with Janie Ziye Shen 
In 2012, NYC launched one of the country's largest experiments in raising the quality of subsidized family child care. More than three years since the launch of EarlyLearnNYC, we investigated what has worked and what has not.

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Report | Education

Segregated Schools in Integrated Neighborhoods: The City's Schools Are Even More Divided Than Our Housing

By Clara Hemphill and Nicole Mader
In multi-ethnic New York City, why are so many elementary schools segregated by race and class? New research demonstrates that school segregation is not always the result of housing patterns.

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SPOTLIGHT

Report | Education

Segregated Schools in Integrated Neighborhoods: 
The city’s schools are even more divided than our housing

In multi-ethnic New York City, why are so many elementary schools segregated by race and class? For years, school officials and researchers have assumed that school segregation merely reflects segregated housing patterns—because most children attend their zoned neighborhood schools.

However, new research by The New School’s Center for New York City Affairs demonstrates that school segregation is not always the result of housing patterns. In fact, as these interactive maps show, there are dozens of high-poverty elementary schools that serve mostly black and Latino children that are located in far more racially and economically mixed neighborhoods. READ MORE



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