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New Publication | Urban Matters

Pushed Out: Countering Housing Displacement in an Unaffordable Region

By Pierina Ana Sanchez, Moses Gates, and Sarah Serpas

In New York City’s tristate metro region, more than one million low- to moderate-income households, 70% of them Black or Hispanic, are vulnerable to displacement. As the Regional Plan Association’s recent report on this crisis shows, those most at risk live in pedestrian-friendly urban communities with good access to jobs and services. As demand pushes rents and sale prices in such areas upward, lower-income households are pushed outward. There is a clear link between increasing rents, displacement, and homelessness. In New York City, a 5% rent increase has been associated with an additional 3,000 residents becoming homeless.

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NEW REPORT | CHILDREN, YOUTH & FAMILIES | REPORTS 

Making Room for Babies?: Lessons for the Field

By Kendra Hurley

Many child care centers have seen their enrollment of 4-year-olds decline due to New York City's pre-K expansion, which has dramatically grown the number of early education options available to kids this age. In response, some centers have become interested in “aging down” to serve younger children. This would be a tremendous boon in New York City, where quality affordable and subsidized infant and toddler care is in high demand and short supply. However, "aging down" is difficult. This report looks at ways that affordable and subsidized centers who do provide infant care make it work.

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In 2013, New York City launched an array of programs designed to keep teenagers out of the City’s foster care system.

The programs—known collectively as “teen-specialized preventive services”—represent a pivotal piece of the City’s ongoing child welfare reform agenda: to keep whittling down the number of kids who enter foster care by providing intensive, evidence-based therapy to families in crisis.

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Our six years of key indicators spotlight trends in New York City’s foster care and preventive services systems.

 

Full Survey


New Release 

Monitoring the Minimum Wage: Brief 3 on Lessons From Other Cities

By James Parrott

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CNYCA partners with the Workforce Field Building Hub, an initiative of the NYC-based Workforce Professionals Training Institute (WPTI) on the Monitoring the Minimum Wage issue brief series. The briefs are intended to track the implementation of the $15 minimum wage in New York City by engaging businesses, workers and workforce practitioners, and by assessing the impacts in other jurisdictions around the country.

Monitoring the Minimum Wage: Brief 3 on lessons from other cities is available here.

Previous issues in the series are available here.


By Kendra Hurley

Growing interest in early education has led to more infant classrooms in child care centers—but they’re mostly for wealthy families.

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After a series of widely publicized child deaths in 2016, New York City's child welfare system continues to struggle under a glut of new cases.

In response to a surge in child abuse and neglect reports, the Administration for Children’s Services (ACS) has drastically increased the number of families it brings into the system, filing more cases in Family Court and placing more children in foster care.

But the resulting system-overload, they say, increases the risk of breaking up families unnecessarily, and may make children less safe.

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NEW BRIEF

No Heavy Lifting Required: New York City's Unambitious School 'Diversity Plan

Earlier this month, the New York City Department of Education (DOE) released a long-awaited plan designed to increase diversity in the city's public schools. The Center for New York City Affairs has crunched the numbers on these goals and found that they would not reflect meaningful, systemic change.

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NEW INITIATIVE

 
 

Across the city, social service agencies are increasingly employing staff who’ve themselves had run-ins with the law as “Credible Messengers” to other court-involved youth. It’s a recognition of the powerful positive impact mentors who’ve had similar life experiences can have in changing young lives. 

To foster this important work, the Center for New York City Affairs is pleased to announce the launch of the Institute for Transformative Mentoring (ITM). ITM is a training program focused on the professional and personal development of such Credible Messengers. It’s a semester-long course, developed with Credible Messengers and the help of training and education experts and foundation and non-profit leaders, that’s designed to enhance the practical skills of Credible Messengers and also further the healing of their own lives. ITM will support the work of this unique and growing workforce.  

For more information, click here.


Every morning in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, Chinese-born grandmas and grandpas stream towards a recycling center on 62nd Street. They carry bags or drag shopping carts overflowing with bottles and cans they have collected over the course of days or weeks, each redeemable for 3 cents.

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Urban Matters

Reality Check: Too Many Workers Still Don’t Get Higher Wages or Paid Sick Leave

By Nancy Rankin and Irene Lew

It’s been almost four years since New York City vastly expanded paid sick leave coverage for workers in small businesses. A wave of other new City and State measures have followed, raising the minimum wage, restricting unreasonable work scheduling practices, and, beginning January 1st of this year, establishing job-protected paid family leave for nearly all private sector employees statewide. Together, they arguably make up the nation’s most ambitious package of labor standards reforms since the New Deal.

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