Main page.jpg

Latest Publication | Urban Matter

If At First You Don't Rezone...

By Flávia Leite

The New York City Council recently approved by a vote of 43-0 the de Blasio Administration’s East Midtown rezoning plan. It marked the final step in a torturous journey begun when, in the waning days of his mayoralty four years ago, Mayor Michael Bloomberg put forward, then withdrew for lack of political support, an earlier rezoning plan intended to modernize a 73-block business district anchored by Grand Central Station.

READ MORE


By Kendra Hurley

Growing interest in early education has led to more infant classrooms in child care centers—but they’re mostly for wealthy families.

READ MORE


After a series of widely publicized child deaths in 2016, New York City's child welfare system continues to struggle under a glut of new cases.

In response to a surge in child abuse and neglect reports, the Administration for Children’s Services (ACS) has drastically increased the number of families it brings into the system, filing more cases in Family Court and placing more children in foster care.

But the resulting system-overload, they say, increases the risk of breaking up families unnecessarily, and may make children less safe.

READ MORE


NEW BRIEF

No Heavy Lifting Required: New York City's Unambitious School 'Diversity Plan

Earlier this month, the New York City Department of Education (DOE) released a long-awaited plan designed to increase diversity in the city's public schools. The Center for New York City Affairs has crunched the numbers on these goals and found that they would not reflect meaningful, systemic change.

READ MORE


NEW REPORT

Adrift in NYC: Family Homelessness and the Struggle to Stay Together

As family homelessness in New York City continues to climb and the City fights to open 90 new shelters, a new report by the Center for New York City Affairs at the New School offers insight into how family shelters are missing opportunities to avert a hidden but common catastrophe of homelessness: families breaking apart.

The report, Adrift in NYC: Family Homelessness and the Struggle to Stay Together,” sheds light on the academic research showing that homelessness and family breakup go hand in hand. Partners separate from partners. Children separate from parents – both through informal arrangements with friends and relatives as well as through mandated foster care placements. And what begins as a temporary arrangement often proves lasting. Family members who do stay together often do so against a relentless backdrop of fear that, having lost their homes, they will next lose one another.

READ MORE


NEW INITIATIVE

 
Logo-vertical.png
 

Across the city, social service agencies are increasingly employing staff who’ve themselves had run-ins with the law as “Credible Messengers” to other court-involved youth. It’s a recognition of the powerful positive impact mentors who’ve had similar life experiences can have in changing young lives. 

To foster this important work, the Center for New York City Affairs is pleased to announce the launch of the Institute for Transformative Mentoring (ITM). ITM is a training program focused on the professional and personal development of such Credible Messengers. It’s a semester-long course, developed with Credible Messengers and the help of training and education experts and foundation and non-profit leaders, that’s designed to enhance the practical skills of Credible Messengers and also further the healing of their own lives. ITM will support the work of this unique and growing workforce.  

For more information, click here.



Urban Matter

Constitutional Convention: Vote Yes or No?

By Dr. Gerald Benjamin and Karen Scharff

The New York State Constitution requires that every 20 years the people decide if a constitutional convention should be held to consider amendments to the Constitution. That decision will be made by a statewide ballot question on Election Day, Nov. 7th. If a majority votes “no,” there will be no convention; if a majority votes “yes,” three delegates from each State Senatorial district and 15 at-large statewide delegates will be elected in November 2018, and convene at the State Capitol in April 2019. Amendments adopted by a majority of the delegates will be submitted to the voters via a statewide referendum and, if approved, go into effect on the following Jan. 1st.

READ MORE

 






RECENT Events