Big Dreams for New York's Youngest Children: The future of early care and education

Presented by the Center for New York City Affairs at The New School in collaboration with the Child Care and Early Education Fund

With the creation of EarlyLearnNYC in 2012, New York City reinvented its system for subsidized early care and education for children from low-income families. Officials sought to ensure high quality, developmentally smart care--but a string of financial and logistical hurdles posed difficulties for many of the nonprofit organizations that run these programs. Today, some thrive while others have lost their contracts or struggle to remain open. Now, as the city launches an expanded Pre-K network for 4-year-olds, what will happen to subsidized child care for younger kids? Can the reform vision of EarlyLearn be put fully into action, and sustained? A conversation with experts in the field, and the release of findings from a new Center for New York City Affairs report on early care and education.

With:

  • Steve Barnett,director, National Institute for Early Education Research at Rutgers University
  • Maria Benejan, associate commissioner, Division of Early Care and Education at New York City Administration for Children's Services
  • Takiema Bunche-Smith, education director, Brooklyn Kindergarten Society
  • Gregory Brender, policy analyst, United Neighborhood Houses 
  • Maria Contreras-Collier, executive director, Cypress Hills Child Care Corporation

Moderator:

  • Abigail Kramer, associate editor, Center for New York City Affairs

Click here for Participant Bios.

Access and download the Executive Summary, Findings and Recommendations.

[youtube width="630" height="350"]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pX1QxHRi5U8[/youtube]

Surveillance City: The War on Drugs in Urban Neighborhoods

Presented by the Center for New York City Affairs at The New School

2014 Nathan Levin Lecture on Public Policy

The War on Drugs has created a powerful surveillance state in America’s most disadvantaged neighborhoods. High-tech techniques criminalize entire blocks and transform informal community networks into liabilities for local residents as police use family relationships to demand information, pursue suspects and threaten incarceration. The presumption of criminality takes a relentless toll.

Our 2014 Nathan Levin Lecturer, sociologist Alice Goffman, spent six years living in one neighborhood in Philadelphia, documenting the complex web of warrants and surveillance. She describes the long-term damage done to working class and low-income families and communities.

  • Alice Goffman, assistant professor of sociology, University of Wisconsin-Madison; author, On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City

Followed by a conversation with:

  • Jeff Smith, assistant professor of politics and advocacy, Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy, The New School
  • Jamelle Bouie, politics, policy, and race reporter, Slate

[youtube width="640" height="360"]http://youtu.be/LcsoXnVxkDU[/youtube]

The Nathan Levin Lecture on Public Policy was established in 1989 in honor of the late Nathan Levin, a trustee and acting president of The New School. Mr. Levin was one of a number of local civic leaders affiliated with The New School in the early 1960s who sought to promote the university’s involvement in reform politics and community service. Their vision led to the founding of the Center for New York City Affairs and the Milano School's program in urban policy analysis and management.

Taking the Fear Out of Financial Aid: Making Higher Education Easier to Achieve for NYC Students

Securing college financial aid can be intimidating for NYC students. Aid is crucial for low-income and first generation college students—but they need help, particularly navigating the government’s Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), finding grants and loans and working with college aid offices.

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Baby Steps: Poverty, Chronic Stress & New York's Youngest Children

Chronic stress and early trauma shape the brain development of very young children. Increasingly, research shows that innovative, early-life work with infants, toddlers and their parents can help prevent the need for much more costly interventions later on. Can we reduce the likelihood of abuse, neglect and mental illness in stressed-out, low-income families?

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