The Painful Price of Medicaid

The fast-rising cost of Medicaid is one the most pressing issues facing the governments of New York City and State. One in four New Yorkers are served by the system of insurance, which now costs an average of $1 billion a week. Health care for the poor and long term care for the disabled and older people are more expensive than ever—and their recent growth exceeds the size the state budget gap. Governor Andrew Cuomo’s new Medicaid Redesign Team made recommendations that would create nearly $3 billion in savings.

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The Obama Agenda: Overcoming Poverty in New York and the Nation

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and the Obama administration’s 2010 budget plan include resources and tools for large-scale job creation, increased benefits for low-income and unemployed people, refundable tax credits, and the prospect of new flexible funds for child and family services. What is Washington offering the states, and how will New York respond?

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Crime, Justice and the Economic Crisis

Like New York, most states face deepening budget gaps and are slashing education and human services. Nationwide, states pour $50 billion a year into incarceration. New York led the way in expanding its prison system more than 25 years ago; should it lead the way in the other direction today? Will the federal government take a new approach to criminal justice in an Obama administration?

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Now What? NYC's Election Year Fiscal Crisis

The boom is over, and the city’s families and neighborhoods are beginning to feel the consequences. Mayor Bloomberg managed seven years of rapid budget growth but now, as he prepares a run for a third term, the city faces potentially massive shortfalls. How fast and how hard will a sputtering economy and shrinking revenues hit city services?

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Dawn Of A New Era: NYC Fiscal Policy after the Financial Emergency Act

On July 1, 2008, New York City emerged from 30 years of financial oversight by the state with the expiration of key provisions of the 1978 Financial Emergency Act. What does this pivotal event in the city’s fiscal history mean for the future of the nation’s fourth largest governmental budget? What requirements will sunset, and what procedures will remain in place?

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From Austerity to Surplus to...? Forecasting NYC's Fiscal Future

New York City went from a dire fiscal crisis in 2002 to an estimated surplus of almost $2 billion this year. After years of austerity, higher revenues may spark demands for tax cuts and new spending. As the mayor prepares his Fiscal 2007 budget proposal, we consider how political leaders, business, labor and the nonprofit sector will respond.

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Medicaid: Can New York Control Spending?

With Medicaid expenses accounting for one-third of NYS's budget and still rising, there has been much debate about how to control costs while recognizing the vital importance of the Medicaid program. This explored the political feasibility of major reform of Medicaid, including the possibility of a State take-over of Medicaid spending, as well as long term care and other issues relevant to Medicaid-related spending.

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